Nutrition

Advances since 1990 show that making hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition history is possible. They also show that there is a lot of work ahead if we are to transform that vision into reality.’ – State of Food Security in the World, 2015, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations

Under Goal 2, End Hunger, the Sustainable Development Goals include the following targets;

  • By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round.
  • By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons.

Undernutrition is responsible for almost 50% of all child deaths – or 3 million deaths – each year.

The word undernutrition have many meanings. RESULTS define it as meaning; babies born with a low birth weight, not being properly breastfed, a chronic lack of a diverse diet that stunts children’s growth (‘stunting’), a short-term lack of enough calories that cause you to weigh too little (‘wasting’), and deficiencies of vitamin A and zinc.

Globally, around one in four children have had their growth stunted. Some of the highest rates of stunting are in our own region, such as Timor, where 58% of children under five have had their growth stunted.

There are still about 795 million hungry people in the world, and nearly 160 million preschool-age children do not get vital nutrients. But the problem of hunger can be solved. The planet creates more than enough food to meet everyone’s needs.

The first 1000 days of life – from conception to your second birthday – are the most important for healthy growth and cognitive development. The right nutrition early in life helps children perform better at school, grow into healthy adults, earn more at work and provide their own children a healthy start to life.

Proven solutions exist that can end the preventable child deaths and damage caused by malnutrition. Investing in eliminating undernutrition in very young children can:

  • Help end hunger and break the cycle of poverty – well-nourished children are 33% more likely to escape poverty as adults.
  • Build self-sufficiency – well-nourished children are more likely to continue their education, have higher IQs, and earn up to 46% more over their lifetimes.
  • Boost a country’s GDP by at least 2-3 percent annually.

RESULTS Australia works with national and international partners to promote action to reduce the prevalence and heavy burden of undernutrition. We do this by advocating for greater Australian priority for nutrition programming, better integration with other health-related programs and enhanced co-operation between sectors nationally and internationally.

Quick Facts

  • Undernutrition is responsible for almost 50% of all child deaths, or 3 million deaths each year .
  • Globally, around one in four children have had their growth stunted by a constant lack of a diverse diet. Some of the highest rates of stunting are in our own region, such as Timor, where 58% of children under five have had their growth stunted.
  • The proportion of people hungry is decreasing.
  • Asia showed a dramatic decrease from 49% in 1990 to 28% in 2010, nearly halving the number of stunted children from 190 million to 100 million.



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