An Investment in the Global Partnership for Education is an Investment in the Future

Since 2002 the General Partnership for Education (GPE) has been increasing the opportunities available to people living in impoverished countries, by improving and fortifying their education systems as part of a collaborative effort between national governments, international agencies, the private sector and civil society. Already a long-time supporter of the GPE Australia has a chance to contribute to this program, helping it expand to 870 million young people.

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Charities Warn Australia’s Foreign Donation Laws Will Strangle Advocacy

December 7 was meant to be a day of celebration in Parliament House with legislation finally passing in support of marriage equality. But for Australia’s NGOs, celebrations were muted with the release of a bill with stiff new rules for charities working abroad. For RESULTS Australia chief executive officer, Maree Nutt, there was deep concern for what the legislation would mean for her organization which is reliant on international funding and support to educate parliamentarians on a range of global issues including immunization, tuberculosis, nutrition, and education.

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Despite progress made in polio eradication, initiative phaseout poses threat to at-risk countries

“Rethinking how to achieve global health goals, such as universal immunization, can be daunting, especially when restricted within large global programs and financing mechanisms,” Laura Kerr, LLM, a policy advocacy officer for child health at RESULTS UK, and Leila Stennett, campaigns director at RESULTS Australia, wrote. “Yet the scale of the wind down of the [Global Polio Eradication Initiative] partnership is something that has never happened before.”

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Risks and opportunities as funding for polio disappears with the disease

The dissolution of a partnership the size of GPEI is unprecedented. GPEI investments have supported polio vaccinations, trained and supported human resources, as well as provided technical programmatic support. These investments have had an impact well beyond polio eradication in many countries, supporting routine immunisation systems and allowing for other health services to be delivered. The risk now is that when GPEI activities come to a close, these services will also be affected, leaving significant gaps, especially for existing essential immunisation services. A telling example is that 70% of global vaccine-preventable surveillance funding comes from GPEI.

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